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Partnership with CloudLinux

Attacker.NET is glad to inform you that we have entered the partnership with CloudLinux Inc. This partnership opens a great opportunity for our server management customers to improve their hosting environments. We offer discounted CloudLinux licenses for our Reactive & Proactive Server management plans and FREE CloudLinux licenses for our Critical Server Management plans. 

All CloudLinux features are aimed at increasing server stability and security.

CLOUDLINUX BENEFITS:
* Isolates users from each other to avoid the “bad neighbor effect”
* Prevents users from seeing configuration files and other private information
* Allows end user to select PHP versions 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, and 5.5
* Gives the power to monitor and control limits, such as CPU, IO, Memory, and others
* Helps to restrict and throttle MySQL database abusers
* Compatible with all major control panels
* Interchangeable with CentOS and RHEL.

How can I test or preview my website before switching DNS?

 

  1. Locate the HOSTS file on your computer. Typically it is in one of the following locations:
    • Windows NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista/7 – C:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
    • Windows 95/98/Me – C:\windows\hosts
  2. Open this file with a text editor such as Notepad or Wordpad.
    • Right-click on Notepad and select the option to Run as Administrator – otherwise you may not be able to open this file.Then, open the file. Consider performing a “Save As” so you have an original copy of the file that you can restore later. You will see two columns of information, the first containing IP addresses and the second containing host names. By default, a windows hosts file should be similar to the following:
      (In Windows 7 Press and hold Ctrl+Shift while opening the Notepad/Wordpad).

    • Filename: hosts

      127.0.0.1 localhost


      You can add additional lines to this file that will point requests for a particular domain to your new server’s IP address.

      Example:


      Filename: hosts

      127.0.0.1 localhost
      123.123.123.123 example.com

  3. Save your changes (be sure to save as a host file, not as a text file).
    Windows wants to save it as text (.txt) so you need to

    1. Change save as type to all files and then
    2. Click on host  (the original file).
  4. Restart any currently open browsers.
  5. You may also want to flush your DNS cache. In Windows XP, go to Start, and then Run, then type “cmd” and hit enter.
    Type the following:ipconfig /flushdns
  6. In your web browser you should see your site as it appears on your testing server when typing http://example.com/ but still be able to see the site on its current web server by visiting http://www.example.com/

How to Edit Your Hosts File on an Apple Macintosh Using Mac OSX

Let us assume for this example your testing server has an IP address 123.123.123.123 and you wish to visit that server when you type “http://example.com” into a web browser BUT still wish to still see the site as the rest of World Wide Web does when you enter “http://www.example.com” into your browser instead.

  1. Open Terminal, which is in Applications, then the Utilities folder. To do this go to the Finder (Desktop) and from the main main bar at the top of the screen choose “Go” and then “Utilities”. Find the Terminal application icon and double click.
  2. You may want to first make a backup copy of your existing hosts file:
    sudo cp /private/etc/hosts /private/etc/hosts-orig

    Enter your user password at the prompt.Then type the following command to edit your hosts file:

    sudo nano /private/etc/hosts

    Enter your user password at the prompt if asked.

  3. You will see a file with contents similar to the following:

    Filename: hosts

    ##

    # Host Database

    #

    # localhost is used to configure the loopback interface

    # when the system is booting. Do not change this entry.

    ##

    127.0.0.1 localhost

    255.255.255.255 broadcasthost

    ::1 localhost

    fe80::1%lo0 localhost

    Using the arrow keys on your keyboard, navigate around this file an add your domain and IP address to the bottom of the file. For example:


    Filename: hosts

    ### Host Database## localhost is used to configure the loopback interface# when the system is booting. Do not change this entry.##127.0.0.1 localhost

    255.255.255.255 broadcasthost

    ::1 localhost

    fe80::1%lo0 localhost

    123.123.123.123 example.com


  4. When done editing the hosts file, press the keyboard combination Control+O to save the file.
    Then press the Enter on the filename prompt to confirm the Save operation. Finally press the keyboard combination Control-X to exit the editor.You may also need to grant yourself sudo priveleges, if you got a permission error in Step 2. In your “Help” menu, search for “root” and select the instructions for “Enabling the root user.” Follow those instructions.
  5. Restart any currently open browsers. You may also want to flush your DNS cache.
    Type the following command into your Terminal window:dscacheutil -flushcache
  6. In your web browser you should see your site as it appears on your testing server when typing http://example.com/ but still be able to see the site on its current web server by visiting http://www.example.com/

Happy New year & Greeting offer!

We’re running a special offer for a limited time on our server management plans! Get the 2nd month for FREE! Just submit a sales ticket after placing your order and we will credit your account for the 2nd month! You pay your first month and you get your second free!

This offer is VALID for the following plans:

Reactive server management
Proactive server management
Critical server management
SolusVM Node management

We wish you a happy, successful, challenging and exciting new year. We are looking forward to do some good business with you next year.

Kind Regards,

Attacker.NET

 

What is RAID?

What is RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)?
RAID creates a single usable data disk, where several physical disks are combined into an array for better speed and/or fault tolerance. There are three key concepts in RAID: mirroring, the copying of data to more than one disk; striping, the splitting of data across more than one disk; and error correction, where redundant data is stored to allow problems to be detected and possibly fixed (known as fault tolerance). Although there are many different levels of RAID.

RAID 0 (Striped set without parity/Non-Redundant Array) Implements data striping where file blocks are written across multiple drives in fragments and requires a minimum of 2 disks. The advantage of a RAID 0 is that the read/write speed is dramatically increased. The more disks in the array the greater the bandwidth. The disadvantage to a RAID0 is that there is no fault tolerance; if a single drive fails it will destroy the array. Also a RAID 0 does not implement error checking so any error is also unrecoverable. A common solution to this is to have a drive outside of the array used as back-up storage in case of a hardware failure.

RAID 1 (Mirrored set without parity) Implements data mirroring. Data is duplicated on two or four drives through a hardware raid controller and provides some fault tolerance. The array is recoverable as long as at least 1 drive has not failed. It provides faster read performance than a single drive and provides drive redundancy in case of drive failure. There is also a very slight reduction to write speed.

RAID 5 (Striped set with dual distributed parity) Implements data striping at a block level, and distributes parity among the drives. The parity information allows recovery from the failure of any single drive because any following reads can be calculated from the distributed parity. Another advantage of a Raid 5 allows for increased read/write speeds while allowing the most efficient use of disk space. RAID 5 requires a minimum of 3 disks.

RAID 10 (RAID 1 + 0) Creates multiple mirrors, where data is organized as stripes across multiple disks and then the striped disk sets are mirrored. RAID 10 offers the same fault tolerance as RAID 1 with increased read/write speeds over a single Raid 1 volume or single drive. RAID Level 10 requires 4 drives to implement.

 

Updating Apache to the latest version on DirectAdmin

You can check the current version of apache by running

/usr/sbin/httpd -v


CustomBuild – current

If you’re using custombuild (as most new boxes are), run the following

cd /usr/local/directadmin/custombuild
./build update
./build apache
./build php n
./build rewrite_confs


CustomApache – end-of-life

If you are using customapache with the 1.3 version of apache to the most recent, run the following:

cd /usr/local/directadmin/customapache
./build clean
./build update
./build apache_mod_ssl

If you’re using apache 2.x, use “./build apache_2” isntead of apache_mod_ssl.
This should update both the configure options and the version of apache to the most recent version.  Once the update has completed, you’ll need to restart apache:

RedHat:

/sbin/service httpd restart
FreeBSD:

/usr/local/etc/rc.d/httpd restart

 

How do I assign additional IP addresses in RedHat/CentOS?

If you are using CPanel, you should add the IP addresses through WHM.  Do not follow these instructions if you are using CPanel.

If you want to assign the addresses 3.2.1.1 – 3.2.1.20 to your server, you will need to create a RANGE file.

cd /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts
ls ifcfg-eth1-range*

If you already have a range file, you will need to create a new one for the new range of IPs you are adding, eg ‘nano ifcfg-eth1-range1` .  If you have one named range1, name the next range2 and so on.

nano ifcfg-eth1-range1

Place the following text in the file:

IPADDR_START=192.168.0.10
IPADDR_END=192.168.0.110
CLONENUM_START=0

Note: CLONENUM_START defines where the alias will start.  If this is the second range file, you will need to set CLONENUM_START to a value higher than the number of IP addresses assigned.  To check what you currently have used, you can run ‘ifconfig –a | grep eth1’.  This will list devices such as eth1:0, eth1:1, eth1:2, and so on.  If you are currently using upto eth1:16, you will need to set CLONENUM_START to 17 to assign the IPs correctly.

How do I check the health of my 3ware RAID array?

3ware allows for a browser interface to be used, however unless accessed locally this can be a security risk. Therefore we suggest using the command line interface if at all possible.

You need to download the 3ware CLI utilities from the vendor website or from your datacenter portal. Installation is as simple as unzipping the file into a separate folder. Please note you MUST be root/administrator to run the utility.

Quick command reference for 3ware CLI tools

These devices must be followed by a number denoting which is being queried.

tw_cli /c0 show (Output shows information needed to know the health of the RAID array)

./tw_cli /c1 show

Example:

Unit  UnitType  Status         %Cmpl  Stripe  Size(GB)  Cache  AVerify  IgnECC

——————————————————————————

u0    RAID-5    OK             –      64K     465.641   OFF    OFF      OFF

Port   Status           Unit   Size        Blocks        Serial

—————————————————————

p0     OK               u0     233.76 GB   490234752     WD-WCANY1727093

p1     OK               u0     233.76 GB   490234752     WD-WCANY1622544

p2     OK               u0     233.76 GB   490234752     WD-WCANY1657267

p3     NOT-PRESENT      –      –           –             –

*note the following:

c = controller
Controller can be 0 or 1
u = unit
Unit number depends on number arrays. It is 0 in most cases.
p = port
Port denotes port number. In most cases, it is 0-4.

 

How to Optimize MySQL

CentOS
There is a default my.cnf that comes with mysql (4+5) that will make mysql run a bit quicker if you have 2+ gig of ram cp -f /usr/share/mysql/my-large.cnf /etc/my.cnfThere is also my-huge.cnf, or my-medium.cnf depending on your hardware setup.   Check the contents of these my*.cnf files for the one that’s right for you.

*NOTE* the log-bin option is enabled  by default.  This will quickly use a lot of disk space.  It’s recommended to comment out the log-bin line from your /etc/my.cnf, if it exists.

 

Remember to restart mysql when you are done with your my.cnf tweaking:

Redhat:/sbin/service mysqld restart

FreeBSD:/usr/local/etc/rc.d/mysqld restart

Linux is just the kernel, GNU is the OS.

This is an interesting read and some old history copied from http://www.gnu.org/gnu/linux-and-gnu.html

Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called “Linux”, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project.

There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine’s resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called “Linux” distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.

Many users do not understand the difference between the kernel, which is Linux, and the whole system, which they also call “Linux”. The ambiguous use of the name doesn’t help people understand. These users often think that Linus Torvalds developed the whole operating system in 1991, with a bit of help.

Programmers generally know that Linux is a kernel. But since they have generally heard the whole system called “Linux” as well, they often envisage a history that would justify naming the whole system after the kernel. For example, many believe that once Linus Torvalds finished writing Linux, the kernel, its users looked around for other free software to go with it, and found that (for no particular reason) most everything necessary to make a Unix-like system was already available.

What they found was no accident—it was the not-quite-complete GNU system. The available free software added up to a complete system because the GNU Project had been working since 1984 to make one. In the The GNU Manifesto we set forth the goal of developing a free Unix-like system, called GNU. The Initial Announcement of the GNU Project also outlines some of the original plans for the GNU system. By the time Linux was started, GNU was almost finished.

Most free software projects have the goal of developing a particular program for a particular job. For example, Linus Torvalds set out to write a Unix-like kernel (Linux); Donald Knuth set out to write a text formatter (TeX); Bob Scheifler set out to develop a window system (the X Window System). It’s natural to measure the contribution of this kind of project by specific programs that came from the project.

If we tried to measure the GNU Project’s contribution in this way, what would we conclude? One CD-ROM vendor found that in their “Linux distribution”, GNU software was the largest single contingent, around 28% of the total source code, and this included some of the essential major components without which there could be no system. Linux itself was about 3%. (The proportions in 2008 are similar: in the “main” repository of gNewSense, Linux is 1.5% and GNU packages are 15%.) So if you were going to pick a name for the system based on who wrote the programs in the system, the most appropriate single choice would be “GNU”.

But that is not the deepest way to consider the question. The GNU Project was not, is not, a project to develop specific software packages. It was not a project to develop a C compiler, although we did that. It was not a project to develop a text editor, although we developed one. The GNU Project set out to develop a complete free Unix-like system: GNU.

Many people have made major contributions to the free software in the system, and they all deserve credit for their software. But the reason it is an integrated system—and not just a collection of useful programs—is because the GNU Project set out to make it one. We made a list of the programs needed to make a complete free system, and we systematically found, wrote, or found people to write everything on the list. We wrote essential but unexciting (1) components because you can’t have a system without them. Some of our system components, the programming tools, became popular on their own among programmers, but we wrote many components that are not tools (2). We even developed a chess game, GNU Chess, because a complete system needs games too.

By the early 90s we had put together the whole system aside from the kernel. We had also started a kernel, the GNU Hurd, which runs on top of Mach. Developing this kernel has been a lot harder than we expected; the GNU Hurd started working reliably in 2001, but it is a long way from being ready for people to use in general.

Fortunately, we didn’t have to wait for the Hurd, because of Linux. Once Torvalds freed Linux in 1992, it fit into the last major gap in the GNU system. People could thencombine Linux with the GNU system to make a complete free system — a version of the GNU system which also contained Linux. The GNU/Linux system, in other words.

Making them work well together was not a trivial job. Some GNU components(3) needed substantial change to work with Linux. Integrating a complete system as a distribution that would work “out of the box” was a big job, too. It required addressing the issue of how to install and boot the system—a problem we had not tackled, because we hadn’t yet reached that point. Thus, the people who developed the various system distributions did a lot of essential work. But it was work that, in the nature of things, was surely going to be done by someone.

The GNU Project supports GNU/Linux systems as well as the GNU system. The FSF funded the rewriting of the Linux-related extensions to the GNU C library, so that now they are well integrated, and the newest GNU/Linux systems use the current library release with no changes. The FSF also funded an early stage of the development of Debian GNU/Linux.

Today there are many different variants of the GNU/Linux system (often called “distros”). Most of them include non-free software—their developers follow the philosophy associated with Linux rather than that of GNU. But there are also completely free GNU/Linux distros. The FSF supports computer facilities for two of these distributions, Ututoand gNewSense.

Making a free GNU/Linux distribution is not just a matter of eliminating various non-free programs. Nowadays, the usual version of Linux contains non-free programs too. These programs are intended to be loaded into I/O devices when the system starts, and they are included, as long series of numbers, in the “source code” of Linux. Thus, maintaining free GNU/Linux distributions now entails maintaining a free version of Linux too.

Whether you use GNU/Linux or not, please don’t confuse the public by using the name “Linux” ambiguously. Linux is the kernel, one of the essential major components of the system. The system as a whole is basically the GNU system, with Linux added. When you’re talking about this combination, please call it “GNU/Linux”.

If you want to make a link on “GNU/Linux” for further reference, this page and http://www.gnu.org/gnu/the-gnu-project.html are good choices. If you mention Linux, the kernel, and want to add a link for further reference, http://foldoc.org/linux is a good URL to use.

Addendum: Aside from GNU, one other project has independently produced a free Unix-like operating system. This system is known as BSD, and it was developed at UC Berkeley. It was non-free in the 80s, but became free in the early 90s. A free operating system that exists today(4) is almost certainly either a variant of the GNU system, or a kind of BSD system.

People sometimes ask whether BSD too is a version of GNU, like GNU/Linux. The BSD developers were inspired to make their code free software by the example of the GNU Project, and explicit appeals from GNU activists helped persuade them, but the code had little overlap with GNU. BSD systems today use some GNU programs, just as the GNU system and its variants use some BSD programs; however, taken as wholes, they are two different systems that evolved separately. The BSD developers did not write a kernel and add it to the GNU system, and a name like GNU/BSD would not fit the situation.(5)

Notes:

  1. These unexciting but essential components include the GNU assembler, GAS and the linker, GLD, both are now part of the GNU Binutils package, GNU tar, and more.
  2. For instance, The Bourne Again SHell (BASH), the PostScript interpreter Ghostscript, and the GNU C library are not programming tools. Neither are GNUCash, GNOME, and GNU Chess.
  3. For instance, the GNU C library.
  4. Since that was written, a nearly-all-free Windows-like system has been developed, but technically it is not at all like GNU or Unix, so it doesn’t really affect this issue. Most of the kernel of Solaris has been made free, but if you wanted to make a free system out of that, aside from replacing the missing parts of the kernel, you would also need to put it into GNU or BSD.
  5. On the other hand, in the years since this article was written, the GNU C Library has been ported to several versions of the BSD kernel, which made it straightforward to combine the GNU system with that kernel. Just as with GNU/Linux, these are indeed variants of GNU, and are therefore called, for instance, GNU/kFreeBSD and GNU/kNetBSD depending on the kernel of the system. Ordinary users on typical desktops can hardly distinguish between GNU/Linux and GNU/*BSD.