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This offer is VALID for the following plans:

Reactive server management
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We wish you a happy, successful, challenging and exciting new year. We are looking forward to do some good business with you next year.

Kind Regards,

Attacker.NET

 

What is RAID?

What is RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)?
RAID creates a single usable data disk, where several physical disks are combined into an array for better speed and/or fault tolerance. There are three key concepts in RAID: mirroring, the copying of data to more than one disk; striping, the splitting of data across more than one disk; and error correction, where redundant data is stored to allow problems to be detected and possibly fixed (known as fault tolerance). Although there are many different levels of RAID.

RAID 0 (Striped set without parity/Non-Redundant Array) Implements data striping where file blocks are written across multiple drives in fragments and requires a minimum of 2 disks. The advantage of a RAID 0 is that the read/write speed is dramatically increased. The more disks in the array the greater the bandwidth. The disadvantage to a RAID0 is that there is no fault tolerance; if a single drive fails it will destroy the array. Also a RAID 0 does not implement error checking so any error is also unrecoverable. A common solution to this is to have a drive outside of the array used as back-up storage in case of a hardware failure.

RAID 1 (Mirrored set without parity) Implements data mirroring. Data is duplicated on two or four drives through a hardware raid controller and provides some fault tolerance. The array is recoverable as long as at least 1 drive has not failed. It provides faster read performance than a single drive and provides drive redundancy in case of drive failure. There is also a very slight reduction to write speed.

RAID 5 (Striped set with dual distributed parity) Implements data striping at a block level, and distributes parity among the drives. The parity information allows recovery from the failure of any single drive because any following reads can be calculated from the distributed parity. Another advantage of a Raid 5 allows for increased read/write speeds while allowing the most efficient use of disk space. RAID 5 requires a minimum of 3 disks.

RAID 10 (RAID 1 + 0) Creates multiple mirrors, where data is organized as stripes across multiple disks and then the striped disk sets are mirrored. RAID 10 offers the same fault tolerance as RAID 1 with increased read/write speeds over a single Raid 1 volume or single drive. RAID Level 10 requires 4 drives to implement.

 

Updating Apache to the latest version on DirectAdmin

You can check the current version of apache by running

/usr/sbin/httpd -v


CustomBuild – current

If you’re using custombuild (as most new boxes are), run the following

cd /usr/local/directadmin/custombuild
./build update
./build apache
./build php n
./build rewrite_confs


CustomApache – end-of-life

If you are using customapache with the 1.3 version of apache to the most recent, run the following:

cd /usr/local/directadmin/customapache
./build clean
./build update
./build apache_mod_ssl

If you’re using apache 2.x, use “./build apache_2” isntead of apache_mod_ssl.
This should update both the configure options and the version of apache to the most recent version.  Once the update has completed, you’ll need to restart apache:

RedHat:

/sbin/service httpd restart
FreeBSD:

/usr/local/etc/rc.d/httpd restart

 

How do I assign additional IP addresses in RedHat/CentOS?

If you are using CPanel, you should add the IP addresses through WHM.  Do not follow these instructions if you are using CPanel.

If you want to assign the addresses 3.2.1.1 – 3.2.1.20 to your server, you will need to create a RANGE file.

cd /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts
ls ifcfg-eth1-range*

If you already have a range file, you will need to create a new one for the new range of IPs you are adding, eg ‘nano ifcfg-eth1-range1` .  If you have one named range1, name the next range2 and so on.

nano ifcfg-eth1-range1

Place the following text in the file:

IPADDR_START=192.168.0.10
IPADDR_END=192.168.0.110
CLONENUM_START=0

Note: CLONENUM_START defines where the alias will start.  If this is the second range file, you will need to set CLONENUM_START to a value higher than the number of IP addresses assigned.  To check what you currently have used, you can run ‘ifconfig –a | grep eth1’.  This will list devices such as eth1:0, eth1:1, eth1:2, and so on.  If you are currently using upto eth1:16, you will need to set CLONENUM_START to 17 to assign the IPs correctly.